こんにちは、平井です。

今日はDaniel講師がブログを書いてくれました。

私はよくDaniel講師と雑談をするのですが、皆さんご存知の通り、お話がとても上手です。

「何か面白い話をして下さい」というテキトーな振りでも、割と時間をおかずに期待した通りの「お返事」が返ってきます。

というわけで、今日もいつものノリで面白い話を注文してみました(笑)

結果、笑っていいのか?はばかられるような惨劇の思い出話になっていますが、翻訳も鬼気迫る感じになっておりますので、気分転換にお読みください(_  _  )

 

 

Last night, my wife made a particularly spicy (and delicious) curry that brought to mind a memorable (and funny in retrospect) event that happened when my children were very young.

You may not know that I have a little vegetable garden in my very small backyard.  Generally, I like to grow tomatoes, radishes and various herbs these days, but when I first started the garden, I grew (among other things) habanero peppers.

Peppers have their pungency, or “hotness”, measured on something called the Scoville scale. Generally, the scale is divided into 5 levels of pungency (“hotness” in this context) where SHU are Scoville Heat Units.


Anyway, you have to be very careful with habaneros when you handle them. I’ve never had a problem when picking them, but when cutting them up for cooking, I would wear rubber gloves and use a flattened-out milk carton instead of a cutting board.  This way, I didn’t get the spicy oils from the peppers on the cutting board (you do NOT want the oils to touch your skin), and I could throw it away after I was finished.To give you some perspective, bell peppers rate about 100 SHU and Tabasco sauce is at about 3,000 to 4,000 SHU.  For those of you who do not know, habaneros are one of the hottest of the common hot peppers, and measure at anywhere from 100,000 to 350,000 SHU.  I like spicy food.    

Harvest time came and I picked about 20 peppers and placed them in a bowl in the pantry, well out of the reach of small children.

I distinctly remember telling my wife not to use or even touch them.  She may not have been paying attention (or perhaps my vehemence was not as clear as I thought it was) because the next day, thinking they were overripe and diminutive bell peppers (habanero peppers are usually small and bright orange), she decided to use them in making dinner.

My daughter, at the time, was two years old, and loved to help her mommy with the cooking.  My wife would cut some vegetables and my daughter would grab them and put them in the bowl…very cute if not very efficient.  She (my daughter) had also discovered an affinity for tomatoes, and would often sample some of them before transferring the rest to the bowl.  I suspect that the orange color of the habanero peppers was similar enough to tomatoes that my daughter decided they were worth a taste.

I was in the next room spending time with my son (four years old at the time) when I heard an ungodly noise.  I jumped up, ran into the kitchen and saw my daughter screaming, my wife standing with a quizzical look on her face, and a mess of dismembered peppers bleeding out on the cutting board.  Not good.

As anyone who has ever eaten really spicy food knows, there aren’t many things you can do to ameliorate the problem besides drinking milk and waiting it out.  Well, I grabbed my daughter (and she grabbed me) and headed for the bathroom.  I told my wife in no uncertain terms to put down the knife and to wash her hands at least 20 times before she touched anything else.  I also admonished her to not touch the knife, the peppers, the cutting board or the bowl again…I would take care of them.  I washed off my daughter’s face and hands as best I could and prepared a cool bottle of milk to help soothe the heat.  In the meantime, my wife had not been careful enough, and had touched her mouth, nose and eyes while I was in the bathroom with my daughter.

For the next two hours, my wife was struggling with a burning face, my daughter was sobbing through a burning mouth, face and chest (small children drool a lot when they cry), and I was feeling the burn everywhere that my daughter had touched me.  My son just momentarily wondered why everyone else was miserable and then went back to playing.

I don’t grow habanero peppers anymore, and my wife stays away from any peppers that are not green.  My daughter, on the other hand, is the queen of spicy food, and can handle it better than most adults I know….go figure.

 

昨夜、私の妻が特別にスパイシーな(そして美味しい)カレーを作ってくれたのですが、それを食べて、うちの子供たちがとても小さかった時に起こった思い出深い(そして回顧して笑ってしまうような)出来事が蘇りました。

ご存知ないかと思いますが、我が家の非常に狭い裏庭には小さい菜園があります。最近私は好んでトマト、ラディッシュ、そしていろんなハーブを育てているのですが、この菜園を始めた当初は(数ある中で)ハバネロペッパーを育てていました。

ペッパー(胡椒・唐辛子)はスコヴィル値とかなんとかいう単位で図られる「辛味」を含んでいます。一般的に、その単位は5レベルの辛さに分けられます。

皆さんが見当をつけられるように言うと、ピーマンの値は100SHUくらいで、タバスコソースはだいたい3,000~4,000SHUです。ご存じない方々のために、ハバネロはよくある唐辛子の中で最も辛いもの一つです。そしてその辛さは100,000~350,000SHUのあたりになります。私は辛い食べ物が好きなんですよ。

いずれにしても、ハバネロを扱うときは細心の注意を払わないといけません。ハバネロを収穫する際にトラブったことはありませんが、料理中にカットして切り開く時には、ゴム手袋をして、まな板を使う代わりに平らに広げた牛乳パックを使うでしょう。こうすることで唐辛子から出る辛いオイルがまな板につかないし(絶対に皮膚にオイルをつけたくないでしょう)、全部終わったらそれは捨てます。

収穫の時期が来て私は20ほどの唐辛子を摘みました。そしてそれらを、小さい子供達の手が絶対に届かないように、パントリー(食糧庫)にあるボウルに入れておいたんです。私は妻にこの唐辛子を使わないでね、触ってもダメだよと言ったのをはっきりと覚えています。彼女は気にとめていなかったのかもしれません(もしくは、私の熱い訴えが、自分で思ったほどには明確に伝わっていなかったのでしょう)。なぜならその翌日、彼女は、それらを熟しすぎた小ぶりのピーマンだと思って(ハバネロはだいたい小さくて明るいオレンジ色)夜ご飯の材料に使うことにしたのです。

うちの娘は、当時2歳で、母親が料理するのを手伝うのが好きでした。妻がいくつかの野菜を切って、娘はそれを掴んでボウルに入れる...効率的ではないけれどとてもかわいいですよね。娘はトマトを気に入って、しばしばボウルに入れる前に少し味見をしていました。私は、(今考えると)ハバネロのオレンジ色がトマトによく似ているので、きっと娘は味見してみようと思ったのではないかと疑っています。

とんでもない激しいノイズが聞こえた時、私は隣の部屋で当時4歳の息子と遊んでいました。私が飛び上がってキッチンに駆け込むと、娘が泣き叫んでいて、妻はいぶかしげな表情で立っていました。そしてまな板の上には切り刻まれた唐辛子が散らかって「血を流して」いました。こりゃいかん。

本当に辛い食べ物を食べたことがある人なら誰でも知っているように、牛乳を飲んで辛さが引くのを待つほかにこの問題を改善するためにあなたができることは多くはありません。私は娘を急いで抱えて(そして彼女も私にしがみついて)浴室に向かいました。妻には、絶対に聞き間違わないくらいはっきりとした言葉で、包丁を置いて、他のものに触る前に少なくとも20回は手を洗うように言いました。また、包丁、唐辛子、まな板、ボウルには触らないこと、私が片づけるから、と注意しました。私はできる限り娘の顔と手を洗い、その熱を鎮める助けになればと冷たい牛乳瓶を用意しました。私が娘と浴室にいた間、妻は十分に注意を払っていなくて、口、鼻、目を触ってしまっていました。その後の2時間、妻は焼けるような顔に悶え苦しみ、娘は焼けるような口、顔、胸にすすり泣き(小さい子が泣く時はたくさんよだれが出ます)、そして私も娘に触られたあちこちが焼けるように感じていました。息子は、ほんの少しの間、なぜ自分以外はこんなに哀れな姿なのかと不思議に思い、そして遊びに戻っていきました。

私はそれからもうハバネロは育てていません。妻も緑色のもの以外はどんな唐辛子も避け続けています。娘は、一方で、辛い食べ物の女王で、私が知っているほとんどの成人よりも辛い物をうまく制しています...一体どうなっているんだ。